Dia De Los Muertos


Dia De Los Muertos

Trevor and JJ created Ojo Rojo to fulfil a dream of sharing the Mexican social form of dining with the UK. Through Trevor’s travels in Mexico, Ojo Rojo tries to embody the very nature of sharing, appreciation and the gatherings of friends and family.

Day of The Dead is a Mexican holiday that brings a community together to celebrate life and the spiritual journey of those that have passed. Although Ojo Rojo’s celebration is not focussed on a particular passed individual, we believe that bringing together our community into a social environment with food, drinks and music is something that we embody whole fully.

Day of The Dead is a Mexican holiday that brings a community together to celebrate life and the spiritual journey of those that have passed

Day of The Dead is a Mexican holiday that brings a community together to celebrate life and the spiritual journey of those that have passed

Although the festival originates in Mexico, over the years it has grown to become a cultural phenomenon. Who can forget when Daniel Craig appeared as a dapper skeleton in the Bond film, Spectre? But before all that, the festival began as a small three-day celebration for families to honour the lives of deceased loved ones.

Spectre : Dia De Los Muertos

Traditionally, festivities begin on October 31 and run through to November 2. Over this period, it is believed that the gates of heaven open and allow the spirits of deceased ancestors to reunite with their families for 24 hours. On November 1, commonly referred to as All Saints Day, it is believed that deceased adults come back to their families for a day.

Traditionally the festival celebrated a goddess known as “Lady of the Dead”, corresponding to the modern La Calavera Catrina. In the late 20th century, many Mexicans had altered the holiday to celebrate dead children and relatives and moved the celebrations to correspond with Halloween and the catholic tradition of All Saints Day, celebrated in late October and early November.

WHY DO PEOPLE WEAR COSTUMES?

A man named José Guadalupe Prosada created a print of a figure called La Calavera Catrina (“The Elegant Skull”). The image depicted a woman with a skull for a face and was originally made to mock the Mexican upper-class female. Now, it has become the most familiar symbol of the Day of the Dead, individuals paint their faces as calacas and calaveras (skeletons and skulls) and many dress up as Catrina. Chocolate and sugar skulls are often given as gifts to the deceased.

Ojo Rojo embody Dia De Los Muertos through its food, drink, music and events so come down and experience a taste of Mexico this week.

Credits:
Reuters, Wiki, Evening Standard, AFP, The Guardian, Megan Frye (photo)

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